Notes from the No-Man’s Land – Deconstruction of a belief

(Disclaimer: I just want to say, that everything, which I write in this series, may be taken to be, if looked from a completely different point of view(that is, not of the writer’s own, which he is adamant on not making clear anyways), considered complete crap.It’s your call to make. I write, because besides being read, I need to write them(anyway), it’s a need.)

Deconstruction of a belief

We believe in things, facts and people. We believe in their state of mind and thoughts. We often come to have an almost religious belief in them, owing to various reasons. The most usual one being an implicit, blind trust in the system, to remain stable, for things to advance where there are supposed to, where we naturally hope them to be. We go to college, we expect to complete our degree. No, we don’t expect, we don’t hope to complete our degree, we take it as a given that we’d complete our degree. An almost religious belief in things, in the system, in the order of nature. Maybe it is necessary. Necessary for humans to be sane in a chaotic society.

But things go bad, thing go wrong. Sometimes they go horribly wrong. We have many reactions to such kind of situations. We cry, mope and beat our chests, and (since that’s not going to solve things or run the world) finally accept the fate. God came and fucked up our belief system, what can a mortal do. Or, we do the first set of the above things(which is a very flexible set of operations, you can do that or you can just skip) and not contented at heart(the belief still intact, at odds with the system now), we blame the causes of the disaster, and find peace in the blame game. Or, if it strikes our mind at all(which is a rare thing to happen), we go back into ourselves and take a look at the belief. This happens when, try as hard as we might, we can’t explain to ourselves why it happened. Now that’s almost equivalent to not being able to accept the thing, but actually it comes initially after the acceptance part. First you accept it(any which way, because it has happened and you can’t change it), then you can try to accept it with an explanation.

It leads you inside yourself. Diving deeper and deeper into the underground lake of your mind. More pressure, more darkness, but somewhere here, lies your belief. Untouched, unused, untested. Simply assumed. Believed.

What is an idea? What is a belief?

That’s a belief on the outside of it. But it was an idea. An idea the seeds of which germinated long back in your mind without your knowledge, and you didn’t know about it until it had already taken the shape of a belief. But now you critically examine it. You deconstruct it. From belief back to the idea. From idea back to its roots. Back to the reasons. Back to the forces. You deconstruct the belief and you now know it was you who planted in your mind without your own knowledge. But, does it make you NOT believe in it anymore? Does the deconstruction leads to the destruction of the belief? Does it still not call you, from somewhere unknown, even though it lies in pieces, dismantled, in front of you?

How to destroy the belief? How to NOT believe in something when you’ve believed in it all the time up to now? Is knowledge enough?

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Author: Mitostargazer

I read. I write. I listen.

7 thoughts on “Notes from the No-Man’s Land – Deconstruction of a belief”

  1. I believe if an idea has stayed with you long…it can’t be totally wrong…and anyways I don’t believe that there are any wrong ideas and in the same sense any correct ideas…ideas are just a screening process that help us make sense of the chaos around us and therein you have your choice to choose to believe in whatever you want to…or whatever works best to make sense of the chaos…

  2. interesting dicussions…..Conrad seems to have crept into the stage…..belief as it may be concieved of may, well, not always be a set of seeds externally dispersed and grown into a definite form of idea…..there are issues in human psychology that need reconfirmation through ideas based on knowledge, but testing a belief with parameters set by the same belief is, perhaps, not logical….scientific analysis doesn’t allow verification equation with same set of data which contributed to design of such equation….thus, deconstruction (or I may say, differentiation) of belief is allowed to be tested and furthr integrated to design its functional form if the inputs of scutiny are external to the roots of such belief….this subject is one of the widest deliberated topics in philosophy and I find you tabling it from Nowhere’s land is really appreciable….let’s stretch it up….best wishes,

  3. in every aspect construction/creation is a long process & destruction is the quick one…
    but when it comes to ideas n belief it’s exactly opposite..
    implantation is easy, but letting that idea go is cumbersome task..

    personally I have realized more u try to segregate from any thought or belief, it haunts u even more 😛

    Awesome read as ever 🙂

  4. A very interesting post I must say. Deconstruction of the belief leads to destruction, but not always. The broken pieces’ call can’t be ignored. But sometimes some beliefs can’t be deconstructed, they are e^x in differentiation. I have so many questions to ask, but this is not the right time.

    Kudos
    Akash

  5. Well, belief is one thing and whether it is right or wrong is another. Similarly having an idea is one and whether that can be implemented is another. Though as you said, our belief system is corrupted by many things, I would like to add, we don’t apply our brains before accepting it.

    Quite profound, you write on another level.:)

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